Statistics about violence in teen dating relationships dating find meet love

43% of college women report experiencing abusive dating behaviors including physical, sexual, tech, verbal or controlling abuse; the most common abusive behavior experience is controlling behavior (32%), physical (22%) and sexual (22%). Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”. Conducted by Tru Insight, (June 2009), “Teen Dating Abuse Report”.

Teens report an even higher occurrence of abusive dating behaviors including physical, sexual, tech, verbal or controlling abuse; the most common abusive behavior experience is controlling behavior (47%), physical/sexual (29%) and tech (24%). Threats of suicide or self-harm is the leading reason why a college student who is an abused partner stays in the relationship (24%).

The next most common reasons are afraid of losing friends (20%) and dependent on abuser financially (12%). Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”.

Among those college students that experience an abusive relationship, 70% did not realize at the time they were in an abusive relationship, 60% said no one stepped in to try to help them and 42% kept the abuse private and didn’t tell others about it. Conducted by Knowledge Networks, (December 2010), “College Dating Violence and Abuse Poll”. Conducted by Tru Insight, (June 2009), “Teen Dating Abuse Report”.

27.2% of women and 11.7% of men have experienced unwanted sexual contact (by any perpetrator).[vii]One in 6 women (16.2%) and 1 in 19 men (5.2%) in the United States have experienced stalking victimization at some point during their lifetime in which they felt very fearful or believed that they or someone close to them would be harmed or killed (by any perpetrator).[i]Repeatedly receiving unwanted telephone calls, voice, or text messages was the most commonly experienced stalking tactic for both female and male victims of stalking (78.8% for women and 75.9% for men).[iv]About 1 in 5 women and nearly 1 in 7 men who ever experienced rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner, first experienced some form of partner violence between 11 and 17 years of age.[ii]Most female and male victims of rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner (69% of female victims, 53% of male victims) experienced some form of intimate partner violence for the first time before 25 years of age.[vii]A survey of American employees found that 44% of full-time employed adults personally experienced domestic violence’s effect in their workplaces, and 21% identified themselves as victims of intimate partner violence.[iii]64% of the respondents in a 2005 survey who identified themselves as victims of domestic violence indicated that their ability to work was affected by the violence.

More than half of domestic violence victims (57%) said they were distracted, almost half (45%) feared getting discovered, and two in five were afraid of their intimate partner’s unexpected visit (either by phone or in person).[iv]Nine in ten employees (91%) say that domestic violence has a negative impact on their company’s bottom line.

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Kids are most likely to talk about it with their friends rather than their parents, so if you are a parent make sure to read these articles about Children and Teen violence.

We teach our children from a young age to be kind to one another.

Hitting isn’t nice, calling someone names isn’t kind, and sharing is caring.

Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. [15] Task Force on American Indian and Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence. Attorney Generals Advisory Committee on American Indian/Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence.

(2014) February Is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month.

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